Skip to main content

IFC original and writable Assessments: Grade 9

This guide includes IFC Assessments in PDF format that you can download, type into and save. You must use these files in Adobe Reader 8 or higher.

9.1 - Identifies key words, concepts, and synonyms, both stated and implied, for topic and uses them to further research

Assessment:  9.1 Identifying Key Words, Concepts, Synonyms and Related Terms


Lesson and model created by:

Student work provided by:

9.2 - Develops a schema or mind map to express the big idea and the relationships among supporting ideas and topics of interest

Assessment:  9.2 Mind Mapping


Lesson and model created by:

Student work provided by:

9.3 - Takes notes using one or more of a variety of note taking strategies, including reflecting on the information (e.g., graphic organizers, two-column notes)

Assessment:  9.3 Notetaking Grid


Lesson and model created by:

Student work provided by:

9.3 - Takes notes using one or more of a variety of note taking strategies, including reflecting on the information (e.g., graphic organizers, two-column notes)

Assessment:  9.3 Reflective Notetaking


Lesson and model created by:

Student work provided by:

9.3 - Takes notes using one or more of a variety of note taking strategies, including reflecting on the information (e.g., graphic organizers, two-column notes)

Assessment:  9.3 Notetaking to Answer Questions


Lesson and model created by:

Student work provided by:

9.3 - Takes notes using one or more of a variety of note taking strategies, including reflecting on the information (e.g., graphic organizers, two-column notes)

Assessment:  9.3 Notes on Main Ideas and Supporting Evidence


Lesson created by:

Model from:  Empire State Information Fluency Continuum - 9.3 Example

Student work provided by:

9.4 - Organizes information independently, deciding the structure based on the relationship among ideas and general patters discovered

Assessment:  9.4 Organizing Information


Rather than providing a graphic organizer for the students to use to organize their information, 9.4 expects each student to be able to design one for themselves.  In order to be able to do this, the students will first have to determine what kind of organizational structure lends itself best to conveying what they have discovered about the relationships among ideas and general patterns they have observed in the information they have gathered.  See below for a possible example and a rubric you can use to assess the effectiveness of the graphic organizers created by students.

9.5 - Identifies own strengths and sets goals for improvement

Assessment:  9.5 My Strengths in the Inquiry Process


Lesson created by:

Model from: Empire State Information Fluency Continuum - 9.5 Example

Student work provided by:

Subject Guide

We are working to make this website easier to access for people with disabilities, and will follow the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0. If you need assistance with a particular page or document on our current site, please contact mdodes2@schools.nyc.gov to request assistance.